ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Cost-benefit of fungicidal control of cercospora leaf spot of groundnut in the Sudan savanna of Nigeria
 
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Department of Crop Protection, University of Maiduguri P. M. B. 1069, Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Bulus Shapshi Bdliya
Department of Crop Protection, University of Maiduguri P. M. B. 1069, Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria
 
Journal of Plant Protection Research 2007;47(3):329–338
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ABSTRACT
Field trails were conducted to evaluate the economics of controlling cercospora leaf spot of groundnut using different fungicides. The experiments were laid out in a strip plot design with three replications at the Teaching and Research farm of the Department of Crop Protection, University of Maiduguri, sudan savanna of Nigeria during the 2002 and 2003 cropping seasons. Four fungicides namely: Benlate 50 WP, Trimangol 80 WP, Bentex T, and Ridomil 72 WP were applied as foliar sprays at three spray regimes while the control was left untreated. The application of the fungicides led to 20–50% reduction in the disease incidence and 15–22% reduction in disease severity and gave higher yield of seed and haulm than the control. The cost-benefit analysis revealed positive returns per hectare from the use of the fungicides for the control of disease in the study area. Application of Bentex T, for instance, gave 78.13% seed yield increase over the control which translated into a mean (two years) net profit of N52,267.50, N90,905.00 and N138,755.00 Nigerian Naira for one, two and three sprays, respectively, equivalent to $522.675, $909.05 and $1,387.55 per hectare. Even the least effective of the fungicides (Trimangol 80 WP) gave seed yield increase of 62.74% over the control which translated into a mean (two years) net profit of N41,287.50, N68,082.50 and N93,995.00 equivalent to $412.88, $680.83 and $939.95 per hectare for one, two and three sprays, respectively. Three sprays gave 115. 76% increase of yield over one spray and 39.35% yield increase over two sprays. These returns are attractive particularly to the farmers in the study area who grow the high yielding Ex-Dakar groundnut variety which is susceptible to cercospora leaf spot.
CONFLICT OF INTEREST
The authors have declared that no conflict of interests exist.
 
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