ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Identifying mycelial compatibility groups of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum using potato dextrose agar amended with activated charcoal
 
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State Key Laboratory of Rice Biology and Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology of Crop Pathogens and Insects Ministry of Agriculture, Institute of Biotechnology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029, PR China
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Guan-Lin Xie
State Key Laboratory of Rice Biology and Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology of Crop Pathogens and Insects Ministry of Agriculture, Institute of Biotechnology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029, PR China
 
Journal of Plant Protection Research 2012;52(1):77–82
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ABSTRACT
In this study, mycelial compatibility grouping (MCG) of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary was determined in 15 infected potato fields in Bahar and Lelehjin, Hamadan, Iran. Among 193 isolates, 37 MCGs were identified and 67% were represented by single isolates observed at single locations. Within Bahar fields, 29 MCGs were identified and 15 MCGs were recognized in Lalehjin samples. MCGs 2, 6, 18 and 25 were collected at high frequency from multiple locations. The efficacy of Potato Dextrose Agar (PDA) amended with activated charcoal for identifying MCGs in this fungus was tested in doubtful reactions and proved to be an effective medium. The activated charcoal produced a black reaction area in incompatible interactions as well as a red reaction line in PDA amended with McCormick’s red food coloring.
CONFLICT OF INTEREST
The authors have declared that no conflict of interests exist.
 
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