ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Modes of transmission and stability of Rice yellow mottle virus
 
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1
Department of International Agricultural Development, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 1-1-1 Sakuragaoka, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo, 156-8502, Japan
2
Kilimanjaro Agricultural Training Centre, Ministry of Agriculture, Food Security and Cooperative KATC, P.O. Box 1241, Moshi, Kilimanjaro, Tanzania
3
Japan Association for International Collaboration of Agriculture and Forestry (JAICAF), Akasaka KSA Bldg 3F, 8-10-39, Akasaka, Minato-ku, Tokyo, 105-0000, Japan
4
Former Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) Expert Mutsuzawa-machi, Choseigun, Chiba, 299-4403, Japan
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Ayaka Uke
Department of International Agricultural Development, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 1-1-1 Sakuragaoka, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo, 156-8502, Japan
Submission date: 2014-07-25
Acceptance date: 2014-10-27
 
Journal of Plant Protection Research 2014;54(4):363–366
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ABSTRACT
Rice yellow mottle virus (RYMV) is the most important rice virus in Africa. We examined RYMV transmission via soil and water contaminated with RYMV-infected rice plants and by serial cutting with RYMV-contaminated scissors. Transmission of RYMV via dried rice straw kept at 27°C was also examined. The results showed the virus could be transmitted via soil and water, and by scissors. Rice straw that was RYMV-infected was not infective if it was dried and was kept longer than 42 days. By insect transmission experiments and ELISA, long-horned grasshoppers (Conocephalus spp.) were found to be a possible vector of RYMV in Uganda.
CONFLICT OF INTEREST
The authors have declared that no conflict of interests exist.
 
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