ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Role of air and light in sclerotial development and basidiospore formation in Sclerotium rolfsii
 
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1
Department of Plant Pathology, Faculty of Agriculture, Janta Mahavidyalaya, Ajitmal Auraiya (Affiliated to CSJMU Kanpur), U.P., India
2
22 Ganesh Dham Colony, Newada, Sunderpur, Varanasi-221005, U.P., India
3
Department of Mycology and Plant Pathology, Centre of Advance Study in Botany, Banaras Hindu University Varanasi-221005, U.P., India
4
Department of Mycology and Plant Pathology, Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Banaras Hindu University Varanasi-221005, U.P., India
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Singh Udai Pratap
22 Ganesh Dham Colony, Newada, Sunderpur, Varanasi-221005, U.P., India
 
Journal of Plant Protection Research 2010;50(2):206–209
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ABSTRACT
Sclerotium rolfsii is one of the devastating soil-borne phytopathogens which causes severe loss at the time of seedling development. It also causes leaf spots in several crops and wild plants. Petri plates, containing potato dextrose agar medium, were inoculated with S. rolfsii. Two-third area of three, 50% area of three and 100% area of other three plates were sealed with cellophane tape. The other three plates were not sealed. All the plates were incubated at 27±2°C. Two sets of such plates were prepared. One set was incubated in light whereas the other set in the dark. There was no significant difference in mycelial growth and number of sclerotia among them but significant difference was observed when compared to the control, i.e. the plates which were not sealed. Sclerotium and basidiospore formation were directly influenced by air as completely sealed plates failed to produce sclerotia and basidiospores. Basidiospores were produced abundantly in the light and in the dark conditions in unsealed plates only on Cyperus rotundus rhizome meal agar medium.
CONFLICT OF INTEREST
The authors have declared that no conflict of interests exist.
 
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