RAPID COMMUNICATION
Molecular characterization of the partial coat protein gene of an Onion yellow dwarf virus isolate detected in garlic (Allium sativum L.) from the West Shewa zone of Ethiopia
Yohanis Kebede 1, 2, B,D
,  
Jyoti Singh 1, B
,  
Shahana Majumder 1, 3, A,C,E-F  
 
 
More details
Hide details
1
Department of Biotechnology, School of Engineering and Technology, Sharda University, Knowledge Park III, Greater Noida, India
2
Department of Plant Sciences, College of Agriculture and Veterinary Science, Ambo University, Ambo, Ethiopia
3
Department of Botany, School of Life Sciences, Mahatma Gandhi Central University, Chanaky Parisar, Motihari, District East Champaran, Bihar, India
A - Research concept and design; B - Collection and/or assembly of data; C - Data analysis and interpretation; D - Writing the article; E - Critical revision of the article; F - Final approval of article
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Shahana Majumder   

Department of Biotechnology, School of Engineering and Technology, Sharda University, 32-34, Knowledge Park III,, 201306, Greater Noida, Gautam Budh Nagar, India
Online publication date: 2020-03-09
Submission date: 2019-05-14
Acceptance date: 2019-09-02
 
Journal of Plant Protection Research 2020;60(1):106–111
KEYWORDS
TOPICS
ABSTRACT
Onion yellow dwarf virus (OYDV), an aphid-borne potyvirus is one of the major viral pathogens of garlic causing significant yield losses worldwide. It is found almost everywhere in the world where Allium species is grown. The aim of this study was to test the presence of OYDV infection in garlic from Ethiopia. The presence of the virus was tested by Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The direct sequencing of the PCR product produced a sequence of 296 bp. Sequence analysis showed 89.27% sequence homology with an isolate from Australia (HQ258894) and 89.29% with an isolate from Spain (JX429964). A phylogenetic tree constructed with MEGA 7.0 revealed high levels of homology with various isolates of OYDV from all over the world and thus further confirmed the identity of the virus.
CONFLICT OF INTEREST
The authors have declared that no conflict of interests exist.
 
REFERENCES (16)
1.
Conci V.C., Canavelli A., Lunello P., Di Rienzo J., Nome S.F., Zumelzu G., Italia R. 2003. Yield losses associated with virus-infected garlic plants during five successive years. Plant Disease 87 (12): 1411–1415.
 
2.
Conci V.C., Canavelli A.E., Balzarini M.G. 2010. The distribution of garlic viruses in leaves and bulbs during the first year of infection. Journal of Phytopathology 158 (3): 186–193. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1439....
 
3.
Debebe A. 2017. Comparison of meristem culture and heat therapy to clean garlic (Allium sativum L.) infecting virus in Ethiopia. Ethiopian Journal of Agricultural Sciences 27 (3): 1–8.
 
4.
Getachew T., Asfaw Z. 2000. Achievements in shallot and garlic research. Report No. 36. Ethiopia Agricultural Research Organization, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
 
5.
Katis N.I., Maliogka V.I., Dovas C.I. 2012. Viruses of the genus Allium in the Mediterranean region. Advances in Virus Research 84: 163–208. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/b978-0....
 
6.
Keusgen M. 2002. Health and Alliums. p. 357. In: “Allium Crop Science: Recent Advances” (Rabinowitch H.D., Currah L., eds.). CABI Publishing. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1079/978085....
 
7.
Kumar P., Dhawan P., Mehra R. 2011. Characterization, transmission and host range of Onion yellow dwarf virus. Plant Disease Research 26 (2): 176.
 
8.
Kumar S., Stecher G., Tamura K. 2016. MEGA7: Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis version 7.0 for bigger datasets. Molecular Biology and Evolution 33 (7): 1870–1874. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1093/molbev....
 
9.
Lot H., Chovelon V., Souche S., Delecolle B. 1998. Effects of onion yellow dwarf and leek yellow stripe viruses on symptomatology and yield loss of three French garlic cultivars. Plant Disease 82 (12): 1381–1385. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1094/pdis.1....
 
10.
Majumder S., Baranwal U.K. 2014. Simultaneous detection of four garlic viruses by multiplex reverse transcription PCR and their distribution in Indian garlic accessions. Journal of Virological Methods 202: 34–38. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvir....
 
11.
Metasebia M., Shimelis H. 1998. Proceeding of the 15th Annual Research and Extension Review Meeting. Alemaya Research Centre, Alemaya University of Agriculture. 2 April 1998, Alemaya, Ethiopia.
 
12.
Takaichi M., Yamamoto M., Nagakubo T., Oeda K. 1998. Four garlic viruses identified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and their regional distribution in Northern Japan. Plant Disease 82 (6): 694–698. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1094/pdis.1....
 
13.
Takaichi M., Nagakubo T., Oeda K. 2001. Mixed virus infections of garlic determined by a multivalent polyclonal antiserum and virus effects on disease symptoms. Plant Disease 85 (1): 71–75. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1094/pdis.2....
 
14.
Usman M.G., Fagam A.S., Dayi R.U., Isah Z. 2016. Phenotypic response of two garlic varieties to different nitrogen fertilization grown under irrigation in Sudan savannah ecological zone of Nigeria. International Journal of Agronomy (2016): 1–9. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1155/2016/2....
 
15.
Wylie S.J., Li H., Saqib M., Jones M.G.K. 2014. The global trade in fresh produce and the vagility of plant viruses: a case study in garlic. PLoS ONE 9 (8): e105044. DOI: ttps://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0....
 
16.
Yeshiwas Y., Negash B., Walle T., Gelaye Y., Melke A., Yissa K. 2018. Collection and characterization of garlic (Allium sativm L.) germplasm for growth and bulb yield at Debre Markos, Ethiopia. Journal of Horticulture and Forestry 10 (3): 17–26. DOI: https://doi.org/10.5897/jhf201....
 
eISSN:1899-007X
ISSN:1427-4345