ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Gamma irradiation used on adult Tetranychus urticae Koch as a quarantine treatment
 
More details
Hide details
1
Faculty of Agriculture, University of Tabriz, 29 Bahman Blvd, 5166616471 Tabriz, Iran
2
Agricultural, Medical and Industrial Research School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, 31485-498, Karaj, Iran
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Karim Haddad Irani Nejad
Faculty of Agriculture, University of Tabriz, 29 Bahman Blvd, 5166616471 Tabriz, Iran
Submission date: 2013-06-21
Acceptance date: 2014-05-12
 
Journal of Plant Protection Research 2014;54(2):150–155
KEYWORDS
TOPICS
ABSTRACT
The effect of gamma radiation with 0, 200, 250, 300, 350, 400, and 450 Gy intensities on the longevity, total number of eggs, and the percent of hatched eggs laid by irradiated females of Tetranychus urticae Koch (Tetranychidae) was evaluated. Two different groups (0–24 h old and 48–72 h old) of adult females were irradiated. The results showed that 350 and 300 Gy doses significantly reduced the longevity of the 0–24 h old females and the 48–72 h old females. The younger females were more tolerant at lower dose rates than the older females. There was a quadratic relationship between dose rates and young females, while it was linear in older females. The total number of eggs laid by females of both ages was significantly reduced with a linear trend by 250 Gy irradiation. The eggs laid by females of both the 0–24 h olds and the 48–72 h olds lost their hatchability when the dose rate was 350 Gy. It was concluded, that applying a dose rate of 320 Gy on one of the mates (male or female) before mating, or a 300 Gy on both of them, would be sufficient to cause sterility in adult mites.
CONFLICT OF INTEREST
The authors have declared that no conflict of interests exist.
 
REFERENCES (21)
1.
Bakri A., Heather N.J., Hendrichs J., Ferris. I. 2005. Fifty years of radiation biology in entomology: lessons learned from IDIDAS. Ann. Entomol. Soc. Am. 98 (1): 1–12.
 
2.
Bhuiya A.D., Majumder M.Z.R., Hahar G., Shahjahan R.M., Khan M. 1999. Irradiation as a quarantine treatment of cut flowers, ginger and turmeric against mites, thrips and nematodes. p. 57–65. In: “Irradiation as a Quarantine Treatment of Arthropod Pests”. IAEA-TECDOC 1082. International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, Austria, 175 pp.
 
3.
Follett P.A. 2009. Generic radiation quarantine treatments: the next steps. J. Econ. Entomol. 102 (4): 1399–1406.
 
4.
Follett P.A., Griffin R. 2006. Irradiation as a phytosanitary treatment for fresh horticultural commodities: Research and regulations. p. 143–168. In: “Food Irradiation Research and Technology” (C.H. Sommers, X. Fan., eds.). Blackwell Publishing, Ames, Iowa, 446 pp.
 
5.
Follett P.A., Neven L.G. 2006. Current trends in quarantine entomology. Annu. Rev. Entomol. 51: 359–385.
 
6.
Follett P.A, Yang M.M., Lu K.H., Chen T.W. 2007. Irradiation for post harvest control of quarantine insects. Form. Entomol. 27: 1–15.
 
7.
Goodwin S., Wellham T.M. 1990. Gamma irradiation for disinfestation of cut flowers infested by two spotted spider mite (Acarina: Tetranychidae). J. Econ. Entomol. 83 (4): 1455–1458.
 
8.
Hallman G.J. 1998. Ionizing radiation quarantine treatments. An. Soc. Entomol. Bras. 27 (3): 313–323.
 
9.
Hallman G.J., Levang-Briltz N.M., Zettler I.L., Winborne I.C. 2010. Factors affecting ionizing radiation phytosanitary treatment, and implications for research and generic treatments. J. Econ. Entomol. 103 (6): 1950–1963.
 
10.
Hallman G.J. 2011. Phytosanitary applications of irradiation. Comprehen. Rev. Food Sci. Food Saf. 10 (2): 143–151.
 
11.
Hallman G.J. 2012. Generic phytosanitary irradiation treatments. Rad. Phys. Chem. 81 (7): 861–866.
 
12.
Hayashi T., Todoriki S., Nakakita H. 1999. Effectiveness of electron irradiation as a quarantine treatment of cut flowers. p. 49–55. In: “Irradiation as a Quarantine Treatment of Arthropod Pests”. IAEA-TECDOC 1082. International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, Austria, 175 pp.
 
13.
Hennnerberry T.J. 1964. Effects of gamma radiation on the fertility of two-spotted spider mite and its progeny. J. Econ. Entomol. 57 (5): 672–674.
 
14.
Ignatowicz S., Banasik-Solgala S. 1999. Gamma irradiation as a quarantine treatment for spider mites (Acarina: Tetranychidae) in horticultural products. p. 29–47. In: “Irradiation as a Quarantine Treatment of Arthropod Pests”. IAEA-TECDOC 1082. International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, Austria, 175 pp.
 
15.
Kikuchi O.K. 2003. Gamma and electron-beam irradiation of cut flowers. Rad. Phys. Chem. 66 (1): 77–79.
 
16.
Kikuchi O.K, Wiendl F.M., Arthur V. 1999. Tolerance of cut flowers to gamma-radiation. p. 104–193. In: “Irradiation as a Quarantine Treatment of Arthropod Pests”. IAEA-TECDOC 1082. International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, Austria, 175 pp.
 
17.
Meyer M.K.P. 1987. African Tetranychidae (Acari: Prostigmata). Entomology Memoir, Department of Agriculture and Water Supply, Republic of South Africa, 175 pp.
 
18.
Migeon A., Dorkeld F. 2012. Spider Mites Web. Tetranychidae. http://www.Ensam.inra.fr/CBGP/... mweb/index.php [Accessed: October 5, 2012].
 
19.
Osouli Sh., Ziaiea F., Haddad Irrani Nejad K., Moghaddam M. 2011. Irradiation of cut flowers as an alternative quarantine treatment to methyl bromide. Res. J. Chem. Environ. 15 (2): 550–554.
 
20.
Sangwanangkul P., Saradhuldhat P., Robert E.P. 2008. Survey of tropical cut flower and foliage responses to irradiation. Postharvest Biol. Technol. 48 (2): 264–271.
 
21.
Sulaiman H., Osman M.S., Othman Z., Ismail M.R. 2004. Development of irradiation as a quarantine treatment of mites on cut foliage and ornamentals. p. 133–141. In: “Irradiation as a Phytosanitary Treatment of Food and Agricultural Commodities”. IAEA-TECDOC 1427. International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, Austria, 181 pp.
 
eISSN:1899-007X
ISSN:1427-4345