ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Reduced frequency of fungicide application in the management of paprika (Capsicum annuum L.) diseases under dryland conditions in Zimbabwe
 
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Department of Crop Science, University of Zimbabwe P.O. Box MP167, Mount Pleasant, Harare, Zimbabwe Department of Horticulture, Midlands State University, P.O. Box 9055, Gweru, Zimbabwe
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Department of Crop Science, University of Zimbabwe P.O. Box MP167, Mount Pleasant, Harare, Zimbabwe Department of Agronomy, Ahmadu Bello University, P M B 1044, Zaria, Nigeria
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Department of Crop Science, University of Zimbabwe P.O. Box MP167, Mount Pleasant, Harare, Zimbabwe Department of Integrated Crop Protection, Plant Protection Institute P.O. Box 9102, 6700 HC – Wageningen, Netherlands
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Maxwell Handiseni
Department of Crop Science, University of Zimbabwe P.O. Box MP167, Mount Pleasant, Harare, Zimbabwe Department of Horticulture, Midlands State University, P.O. Box 9055, Gweru, Zimbabwe
 
Journal of Plant Protection Research 2007;47(1):19–28
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ABSTRACT
In order to assess the economic benefits of reduced fungicide application for the control of paprika diseases under dryland conditions, on-farm experiments were conducted in the Chinyika Resettlement Area in the Eastern province of Zimbabwe in the 2000/2001 and 2001/2002 seasons. The six fungicide application regimes that were assessed include: weekly interval sprays; Sulphur at 2 weeks after transplanting (WAT) and copper oxychloride-Mancozeb mixture at 6 WAT; spraying after scouting; alternating Sulphur and copper oxychloride- Mancozeb every two weeks; Acibenzolar-s-methyl and unsprayed check. Parameters recorded were disease severity and yield; after harvest an economic analysis was performed. The highest added profit of Z$ 75 930/ha was recorded in the weekly sprayed plots which was not statistically different (p > 0.05) from Z$ 59 410/ha achieved by alternating copper oxychloride and Mancozeb fortnightly at Dengedza site in 2000/2001 season. There were no statistical differences (p > 0.05) between spraying after scouting and Acibenzolar-s-methyl application treatments as they added the least profits of Z$ 990/ha and Z$ 17 250/ha respectively at the same site in the same season. These have serious implications for smallholder farmers in terms of cost savings. Neither were there differences (p > 0.05) in added profits from different spraying regimes at Dengedza site in the 2001/2002 rainy season.
CONFLICT OF INTEREST
The authors have declared that no conflict of interests exist.
 
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