ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Induced systemic resistance to wheat take-all disease by probiotic bacteria
 
More details
Hide details
1
Plant Protection Department, College of Agriculture, Razi University, Kermanshah, Iran
Online publish date: 2018-10-18
Submission date: 2018-04-09
Acceptance date: 2018-05-29
 
Journal of Plant Protection Research 2018;58(3)
KEYWORDS:
TOPICS:
ABSTRACT:
In this study, the effect of six commercial biocontrol strains, Bacillus pumilus INR7, B. megaterium P2, B. subtilis GB03, B. subtilis S, B. subtilis AS and B. subtilis BS and four indigenous strains Achromobacter sp. B124, Pseudomonas geniculate B19, Serratia marcescens B29 and B. simplex B21 and two plant defense inducers, methyl salicylate (Me-SA) and methyl jasmonate (Me-JA) were assessed on suppression of wheat take-all disease. Treatments were applied either as soil drench or sprayed on shoots. In the soil drench method, the highest disease suppression was achieved in treatment with strains INR7, GB03, B19 and AS along with two chemical inducers. Bacillus subtilis S, as the worst treatment, suppressed take-all severity up to 56%. Both chemical inducers and bacterial strains AS and P2 exhibited the highest effect on suppression of take-all disease in the shoot spray method. Bacillus subtilis S suppressed the disease severity up to 49% and was again the worst strain. The efficacy of strains GB03 and B19 decreased significantly in the shoot spray method compared to the soil drench application method. Our results showed that most treatments had the same effect on take-all disease when they were applied as soil drench or sprayed on aerial parts. This means that induction of plant defense was the main mechanism in suppressing take-all disease by the given rhizobacteria. It also revealed that plant growth was reduced when it was treated with chemical inducers. In contrast, rhizobacteria not only suppressed the disease, but also increased plant growth.
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR:
Rouhallah Sharifi
Plant Protection Department, College of Agriculture, Razi University, Kermanshah, Iran
 
REFERENCES (38):
1. Bailly A., Groenhagen U., Schulz S., Geisler M., Eberl L., Weisskopf L. 2014. The inter-kingdom volatile signal indole promotes root development by interfering with auxin signalling. The Plant Journal 80 (5): 758–771. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/tpj.12....
2. Beneduzi A., Ambrosini A., Passaglia L.M. 2012. Plant growthpromoting rhizobacteria (PGPR): their potential as antagonists and biocontrol agents. Genetics and Molecular Biology 35 (4): 1044–1051. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1590/s1415-....
3. Brannen P.M., Kenney D.S. 1997. Kodiak® – a successful biological-control product for suppression of soil-borne plant pathogens of cotton. Journal of Industrial Microbiology and Biotechnology 19 (3): 169–171. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.jim....
4. Chung J.H., Song G.C., Ryu C.M. 2016. Sweet scents from good bacteria: Case studies on bacterial volatile compounds for plant growth and immunity. Plant Molecular Biology 90 (6): 677–687. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11103....
5. Conrath U., Beckers G.J., Flors V., García-Agustín P., Jakab G., Mauch F., Newman M.-A., Pieterse C.M., Poinssot B., Pozo M.J. 2006. Priming: getting ready for battle. Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions 19 (10): 1062–1071. DOI: https: //doi.org/10.1094/mpmi-19-1062.
6. Cook R.J. 2003. Take-all of wheat. Physiological and Molecular Plant Pathology 62: 73–86.
7. Cortes-Barco A., Hsiang T., Goodwin P. 2010. Induced systemic resistance against three foliar diseases of Agrostis stolonifera by (2R, 3R)-butanediol or an isoparaffin mixture. Annals of Applied Biology 157 (2): 179–189. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1744....
8. Deori M., Jayamohan N.S., Kumudini B.S. 2018. Production, characterization and iron binding affinity of hydroxamate siderophores from rhizosphere associated fluorescent Pseudomonas. Journal of Plant Protection Research 58 (1): 36–43. DOI: https://doi.org/10.24425/11911....
9. Desmond O.J., Edgar C.I., Manners J.M., Maclean D.J., Schenk P.M., Kazan K. 2006. Methyl jasmonate induced gene expression in wheat delays symptom development by the crown rot pathogen Fusarium pseudograminearum. Physiological and Molecular Plant Pathology 67 (3–5): 171–179. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pmpp....
10. Djavaheri M., Mercado-Blanco J., Versluis C., Meyer J.M., Van Loon L.C., Bakker P.A.H.M. 2012. Iron-regulated metabolites produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens WCS374r are not required for eliciting induced systemic resistance against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato in Arabidopsis. Microbiology Open 1: 311–325. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/mbo3.3....
11. Handelsman J., Stabb E.V. 1996. Biocontrol of soilborne plant pathogens. The Plant Cell 8: 1855–1869. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1105/tpc.8.....
12. Heil M. 2002. Ecological costs of induced resistance. Current Opinion in Plant Biology 5 (4): 345–350. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/s1369-....
13. Hoffland E., Bakker P.A.H.M., Van Loon L.C. 1997. Multiple diseaseprotection by rhizobacteria that induce systemic resistance-reply. Phytopathology 87: 138. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1094/PHYTO.....
14. Jeun Y.C., Park K.S., Kim C., Fowler W., Kloepper J. 2004. Cytological observations of cucumber plants during induced resistance elicited by rhizobacteria. Biological Control 29 (1): 34–42. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/s1049-....
15. Karnwal A. 2017. Isolation and identification of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria from maize (Zea mays L.) rhizosphere and their plant growth promoting effect on rice (Oryza sativa L.). Journal of Plant Protection Research 57 (2): 144–151. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/jppr-2....
16. Kloepper J.W., Ryu C.M., Zhang S. 2004. Induced systemic resistance and promotion of plant growth by Bacillus spp. Phytopathology 94 (11): 1259–1266. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1094/phyto.....
17. Kohler A., Schwindling S., Conrath U. 2002. Benzothiadiazole induced priming for potentiated responses to pathogen infection, wounding, and infiltration of water into leaves requires the NPR1/NIM1 gene in Arabidopsis. Plant Physiology 128 (3): 1046–1056. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1104/pp.010....
18. Kwak Y.-S., Weller D.M. 2013. Take-all of wheat and natural disease suppression: a review. The Plant Pathology Journal 29 (2): 125–135. DOI: https://doi.org/10.5423/ppj.si....
19. Lemanceau P., Barret M., Mazurier S., Mondy S., Pivato B., Fort T., Vacher C. 2017. Chapter five-plant communication with associated microbiota in the spermosphere, rhizosphere and phyllosphere. Advances in Botanical Research 82: 101–133. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/bs.abr....
20. Liu B., Qiao H., Huang L., Buchenauer H., Han Q., Kang Z., Gong Y. 2009. Biological control of take-all in wheat by endophytic Bacillus subtilis E1R-j and potential mode of action. Biological Control 49 (3): 277–285. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bioc....
21. Mandal S., Mallick N., Mitra A. 2009. Salicylic acid-induced resistance to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici in tomato. Plant Physiology and Biochemistry 47 (7): 642–649. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.plap....
22. Martínez-Medina A., Fernandez I., Lok G.B., Pozo M.J., Pieterse C.M., van Wees S. 2017. Shifting from priming of salicylic acid-to jasmonic acid-regulated defences by Trichoderma protects tomato against the root knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita. New Phytologist 213 (3): 1363–1377. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/nph.14....
23. Moon Ju Y., Park J.M. 2016. Cross-talk in viral defense signaling in plants. Frontiers in Microbiology 7. DOI: https://doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.....
24. Pieterse C.M., Leon-Reyes A., van der Ent S., van Wees S.C. 2009. Networking by small-molecule hormones in plant immunity. Nature Chemical Biology 5 (5): 308–316. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/nchemb....
25. Ryder M.H., Yan Z., Terrace T.E., Rovira A.D., Tang W., Correll R.L. 1998. Use of strains of Bacillus isolated in China to suppress take-all and rhizoctonia root rot, and promote seedling growth of glasshouse-grown wheat in Australian soils. Soil Biology and Biochemistry 31 (1): 19–29. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/s0038-....
26. Ryu C.M., Farag M.A., Hu C.H., Reddy M.S., Kloepper J.W., Pare P.W. 2004. Bacterial volatiles induce systemic resistance in Arabidopsis. Plant Physiology 134 (3): 1017–1026. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1104/pp.103....
27. Ryu C.M., Farag M.A., Hu C.H., Reddy M.S., Wei H.X., Pare P.W., Kloepper J.W. 2003. Bacterial volatiles promote growth in Arabidopsis. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA 100 (8): 4927–4932. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0....
28. Sari E., Etebarian H., Aminian H. 2007. The effects of Bacillus pumilus, isolated from wheat rhizosphere, on resistance in wheat seedling roots against the take-all fungus, Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici. Journal of Phytopathology 155 (11–12): 720–727. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1439....
29. Sharifi R., Ahmadzadeh M., Sharifi-Tehrani A., Talebi-Jahromi K. 2010. Pyoverdine production in Pseudomonas fluorescens UTPF5 and its association with suppression of common bean damping off caused by Rhizoctonia solani (Kűhn). Journal of Plant Protection Research 50 (1): 72–78. DOI: https://doi.org/10.2478/v10045....
30. Sharifi R., Lee S.M., Ryu C.M. 2017. Microbe-induced plant volatiles. New Phytologist 218. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/nph.14....
31. Sharifi R., Ryu C.-M. 2016. Are bacterial volatile compounds poisonous odors to a fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea, alarm signals to Arabidopsis seedlings for eliciting induced resistance, or both? Frontiers in Microbiology 7: 196. DOI: https://doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.....
32. Sharifi R., Ryu C.-M. 2018. Sniffing bacterial volatile compounds for healthier plants. Current Opinion in Plant Biology 44: 88–97. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pbi.....
33. Sharifi R., Ryu C.M. 2017. Chatting with a tiny belowground member of the holobiome: communication between plants and growth-promoting rhizobacteria. Advances in Botanical Research 82: 135–160. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/bs.abr....
34. Shirzad A., Pazhouhandeh M., Ahmadabadi M., Behboudi K. 2012. Analysis of cross-talk between Trichoderma atroviride and Pseudomonas fluorescens. Journal of Plant Pathology 94 (3): 621–628. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4454/JPP.....
35. Walters D., Heil M. 2007. Costs and trade-offs associated with induced resistance. Physiological and Molecular Plant Pathology 71 (1–3): 3–17. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pmpp....
36. Weller D.M., Mavrodi D.V., van Pelt J.A., Pieterse C.M., van Loon L.C., Bakker P.A. 2012. Induced systemic resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato by 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol-producing Pseudomonas fluorescens. Phytopathology 102 (4): 403–412. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1094/phyto-....
37. Yi H.-S., Yang J.W., Ryu C.-M. 2013. ISR meets SAR outside: additive action of the endophyte Bacillus pumilus INR7 and the chemical inducer, benzothiadiazole, on induced resistance against bacterial spot in field-grown pepper. Frontiers in Plant Science 4: 122. DOI: https://doi.org/10.3389/fpls.2....
38. Zablotowicz R.M., Tipping E.M., Lifshitz R., Kloepper J.W. 1991 Plant growth promotion mediated by bacterial rhizosphere colonizers. p. 315–326. In: ”The Rhizosphere and Plant Growth” (Keister D.L., Cregan P.B., eds.). Beltsville Agricultural Research Center (BARC), Beltsville, Maryland, 386 pp. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94....
eISSN:1899-007X
ISSN:1427-4345